Court Hears VIP Plot To Rape Girls From Care Homes – And Then Dispose Of Their Bodies In Acid.

Researching Reform

Southwark Crown Court has heard a case in which a paedophile has claimed that millions of pounds could be made raping children on camera for ‘top political people.’

The hearing took place this month, though no English mainstream media outlets appeared to have covered the trial, which concluded on 13th February, 2018. Only Court News UK,  Breitbart and The Scotsman, have commented.

Gihan Muthukumarana, who has been charged with facilitating sexual activity with a child and three counts of possessing indecent images of children, told an undercover police officer that the film could be sold for as much as £10 million if the girls were then killed and their bodies were disposed of, which he suggested should be done using vats of acid.

Muthukumarana was reported to police after he told an escort about his plans, in a bid to secure her involvement with the making of the…

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Foster Care Review Confirms The Sector Is Still Failing Children.

Researching Reform

A review of the state of foster care in England has just been published. Whilst the report tries very hard to paint a rosy picture of the fostering sector, the data remains virtually unchanged since experts began analysing the way children fare inside the system. The recommendations look mostly at financial issues for foster carers, their status and the suggestion that Independent Reviewing Officers may be dispensable, in a bid to place more funds on the front line.

It’s really all about the money, with a nod here and there to the traumatised and vulnerable children who seem to be cheated out of just about everything.

That the core data about the fostering sector remains almost completely unchanged, or shows no signs of significant improvement in outcomes for children, makes the rhetoric inside the report largely irrelevant. Much of the report’s contents have been noted in previous reports and research…

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Schools Given Almost Unlimited Rights To Search Students.

Researching Reform

Welcome to another week.

The government is giving schools almost unfettered rights to search school pupils without consent, after it updated guidelines last week to reflect the move.

The changes allow school staff to search without consent for “any item banned by the school rules which has been identified in the rules as an item which may be searched for.” We tried to find this guidance online, but could not spot it.

The guidance was exposed in a Schools Week article on 19th January, which focused on the issue of energy soft drinks as a child protection issue, after schools around the country had imposed bans on the drinks on school property, with some searching students’ bags in order to enforce the policy.

The article comes after a public health nutritionist, government behaviour tsar and celebrity chef expressed concerns about the way these drinks affect children’s behaviour and health, and have…

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Runaway train, never going back


The British Association of Social Workers, BASW, commissioned an independent report to look at adoption. The report has just been published.

There’s a summary piece at the Guardian about it

In summary of the summary, concerns about a lack of ethics and human rights approach, concerns that adoption has been politically pushed and dominates thinking, concerns about lack of support for families and adopters, concerns that there’s rigidity in thinking about contact (and the report compares the English approach of an assumption of no direct contact with Northern Ireland where the assumption is that there should be direct contact four to six times per year) and critically that there’s not enough attention being paid to poverty (and austerity) being the driving force behind children being removed from families.

The impact of austerity was raised by all respondents to different extents but was a particular
concern for social workers. Cuts…

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