via Government Refuses To Offer Details Of Ministers Invested In Fostering And Adoption Agencies

Advertisements

Government Refuses To Offer Details Of Ministers Invested In Fostering And Adoption Agencies

Quote

Government Refuses To Offer Details Of Ministers Invested In Fostering And Adoption Agencies

Researching Reform

Information requested by Researching Reform in June, on government ministers with financial interests in fostering and adoption agencies, has been refused by the Ministry of Justice and The Department For Work and Pensions (DWP).

The Ministry of Justice’s replies to two of our Freedom Of Information requests relating to the above query, cited costs as the underlying factor for not being able to provide the information, but did offer the suggestion of narrowing down the request in order to access these details.

The DWP’s response is more controversial. The department’s approach was to classify the data requested as personal information, which under current legislation is protected and so not required to be shared, unless it falls into one or more of the following categories:

  1. Consent from the individual/s concerned
  2. Compliance with a court order;
  3. The prevention of the duplication of payments from public
    funds, or;
  4. Where there is a…

View original post 100 more words

Standard

Children And Families Minister Defends Current Forced Adoption Practices In Bizarre Speech

Researching Reform

In a confused speech delivered during a debate on forced adoption in the House of Commons yesterday, Parliamentary Under Secretary, Nadhim Zahawi defended the ongoing practice whilst also labelling the policy, “appalling”.

Zahawi’s ministerial appointment raised eyebrows, after he was found to have attended the now abolished President’s Club Dinner several times, and allegations around him supplying oil to Islamic State were revealed.

The motion for the debate called on the government to offer a public apology to single mothers in the 1950s and 1960s in the UK, who were coerced into giving up their children for adoption, at a time when government viewed single parenthood as a threat to the social fabric of the country. Zahawi sidestepped this request, failing to address it during the debate.

Instead, the Parliamentary Under Secretary for Children and Families, who Researching Reform is aware reads this blog, tried to shoehorn some ill…

View original post 611 more words

Standard

Forced Adoption Debate – Briefing Paper

Calls to extend the debate beyond forced adoption practices in the 1950s and 1960s were ignored by MPs leading this debate, despite overwhelming support from families, social workers, academics and reformers.

This is a disappointing result, but perhaps MPs will consider hosting another debate in the not too distant future on forced adoption practices in the 21st century…

You can read the briefing paper, which is an 8 page report, here.

Researching Reform

The House of Commons library has just released the briefing paper for the debate on forced adoption, which is taking place tomorrow. MPs will also ask the government to apologise for the practice.

Calls to extend the debate beyond forced adoption practices in the 1950s and 1960s were ignored by MPs leading this debate, despite overwhelming support from families, social workers, academics and reformers. 

This is a disappointing result, but perhaps MPs will consider hosting another debate in the not too distant future on forced adoption practices in the 21st century…

You can read the briefing paper, which is an 8 page report, here. 

FAB.png

View original post

Standard

Support To Widen Forced Adoption Debate Grows.

Researching Reform

Welcome to another week.

As politicians get ready to debate non recent forced adoption practices in the UK, Researching Reform has called on Alison McGovern, the lead MP who called for this debate, to include modern day practices of forced, or non consensual adoption. We tweeted Alison on Saturday, but have not yet had a response.

The motion to discuss forced adoption, which asks that the government recognise the “pain and suffering that the practice of forced adoption caused many women from the 1960s onwards”, has been widely discussed on social media, with campaigners pledging to contact Alison McGovern, and social work professionals supporting the move to widen the discussion, which takes place on Thursday this week, in the House of Commons.

Campaigner, Ian Josephs, who coined the phrase Forced Adoption, wrote to Alison on Sunday, along with several others child welfare reformers and family court activists.

Maggie Mellon, former Vice Chair…

View original post 33 more words

Standard